Presentations

X-plore, X-pand and X-ceed with the new Library Service Platforms

Carl Grant

Abstract

Today’s information and knowledge management systems in libraries are undergoing revolutionary change. In this talk Carl looks specifically at the major challenges being faced by libraries today and offers insight into how the new library service platforms can help librarians meet their mission while addressing some of these key challenges.
He will also look under the hood of the over-utilized term “cloud computing” and offer criteria to use in determining which products truly utilize the cutting-edge technology and which are utilizing cutting-edge marketing. The talk then moves to cover the major LSP offerings and offers insight into how these platforms should be compared and evaluated and the key criteria to be used during that process. Finally it will examine the areas of concern that surround Library Service Platforms. The end result will be your being more knowledgeable in selecting the right LSP technology to meet your library’s mission and needs. In doing this, you will be better equipped to utilize your library’s existing resources to gain increased visibility and value in the library’s end-user’s lives.

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Current and emerging trends for Library services

Daniel Forsman

Abstract

The infrastructure for supplying information resources to higher education and research is in a rapid development cycle. Technology is a driving force behind the shift to electronic resources, discovery, cloud and “as-a-service” solutions. The change of libraries is inevitable as some services are re-oriented and developed while others are phased out. This presentation will look at the current trends at Chalmers University of Technology and describe the strategy for transforming focus of the library from storing information to knowledge creation. Using information resources and knowledge of our users’ needs in an agile environment. Modern library services are based on user expectations and behavior but should also aim to surprise the user. The library is in a unique position at the University with not only knowledge of publication data but also an understanding of personal and organizational data. 

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Primo and Alma: the Ex Libris Next-Generation Library Systems

Tamar Sadeh

Abstract

Until not so long ago, library systems advanced as a response to other developments—as new materials became available, new systems were created to support them. The next-generation revolution began with the perception that library systems should be geared toward users and workflows. The initial step, then, was to separate patron-serving systems and administrative systems. Ex Libris Primo, introduced in 2007, was the first discovery system adhering to this principle. Tailored to end-user needs, Primo offers an intuitive interface to the entire library collection and streamlines the search process by including delivery and other relevant services.

In July 2012, the Ex Libris Alma solution, a next-generation library management system, went live at Boston College in the US. Tens of institutions around the world followed suit. The Alma system, provided as a cloud-based service, was built from the outset around new paradigms: unifying the management of all types of materials, regardless of location and format; facilitating multiple models of collaboration; optimizing workflows for gaining operational efficiencies; integrating with institutional and other services to streamline processes; providing smart reporting and analytics for decision making and for affirming the library’s value in the organization; leveraging the cloud for ease of maintenance; and forming an infrastructure that would support the library in future endeavors.

The session will describe the core concepts behind Alma and Primo and the way in which these two systems enable libraries to maintain their strategic and practical roles as the providers of quality data and data-driven services in a changing world.

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OCLC WorldCat and WorldShare - building strategic services for the 21st century

Axel Kaschte

Abstract

OCLC's ongoing effort to reshape WorldCat and create next generation WorldShare services are designed to address strategic requirements related to library systems in the 21st century. The main driving force is the question of how to connect libraries with the web in all aspects of the lifecycle of scholarly communication. This relates to the discoverability of scholarly material as well as to management of the resources of each library, as the web is the place where scholarly material is created, distributed and consumed. One aspect of the web is its high rate of change, processes are constantly adjusted and new ones defined. This is a major challenge for libraries with their current solutions. To meet these challenges OCLC created a new platform called WorldShare, which is designed as components so that every library has a choice of integrating them as they need them into their current solutions. Emphasize is traditionally placed on the provisioning of metadata services powered by WorldCat, which is constantly reshaped. E.g. in addition to the sharing of the workload of cataloguing in the community, OCLC is providing more and more metadata directly from the publishers and aggregators, fully covering the printed and electronic publications in all the aspects, i.e. article level descriptions as well as package and license information. Based on that, the new WorldShare platform even allows building full library management solutions to gain a high degree of efficiency and allow for new network effects.
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Serials Solutions, Intota: A revolutionary library management system

Richard Burkitt

Abstract

Serials Solutions, a member of the ProQuest family of companies, is a global leader in discovery and management of resources within libraries. Founded by a librarian for librarians in 2000, our popular suite of Software as a Service (SaaS) solutions helps improve access to and use of collections, eases librarian workloads and ultimately reduces operating costs.

Over the years we have adapted our technologies to address the growing needs of our customers and their users. Our services are designed using consistent software architecture and developed from the ground up to work together. Through our Software as a Service (SaaS) technology model and unsurpassed customer care, Serials Solutions provides fast implementation, easy customization and outstanding value to its client libraries.

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Libraries and building e-book collections: X-ploring current and future business models

Dorette Snyman

Abstract

E-books are perceived as having the potential to have a greater impact on the academic libraries and learning than e-journals previously had through the effect on the learning environment and textbook availability. However, academic libraries are struggling to maintain a current understanding of the ever-changing e-book landscape and are limited by the decisions by publishers on the title availability, licensing models and platform functionality offered to libraries. The development of the PDA (patron driven acquisition) model is challenging libraries on the notion of what constitutes “collection building” in terms of ownership in place of providing access to collections, and the required systems to manage this.

This paper will highlight various purchasing and lending models available to libraries, from publishers, vendors and aggregators with some insight into the decision-making process in an academic library. It will also look at new purchasing models developing within the scholarly communication market. It will serve as an introduction to the panel discussion that will include perspectives from the representatives working in the e-book industry.

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How new e-book purchasing models enhance academic libraries’ content provision

Vanessa Gamet

Abstract

Ebook Library (EBL) is a leading global e-book aggregator, serving academic, corporate and research libraries worldwide. With an impressive catalogue of e-book titles from premier international academic publishers, EBL is renowned as a pioneer of flexible, innovative access models such as Patron-driven Acquisition and the esteemed Non-Linear™ Lending model.

ebrary helps customers acquire e-books strategically through a three step approach: Transition, Diversify and Streamline™. The company believes that by challenging the e-book status quo, organisations can effectively serve the diverse and growing needs of researchers and maximise their budgets. Founded in 1999, long before e-books were popular, ebrary is a ProQuest business located in Palo Alto, CA, USA.

EBL and ebrary are working together to provide an unparalleled e-book solution with proven innovation, the greatest content selection, integrated end-to-end management and expert consultation.

ProQuest connects people with vetted, reliable information. Key to serious research, the company has forged a 70-year reputation as a gateway to the world's knowledge — from dissertations to governmental and cultural archives to news, in all its forms. Its role is essential to libraries and other organizations whose missions depend on the delivery of complete, trustworthy information.

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How new e-book purchasing models enhance academic libraries’ content provision

Keith Stanley

Abstract

Dawson Books provides a complete range of e- and print book supply services to libraries across the world. Dawsonera is a powerful e-book platform designed for use with Academic libraries, with nearly 300 000 titles available for purchase or rent. Title by title purchase or rental models as well as sophisticated Patron or Demand driven models (PDA or DDA) are available. Perpetual access, ownership of all purchased titles, multiple user access on all titles – these are just some of the features that makes dawsonera a market leading e-book platform. Dawson’s integrates both print and e-book purchasing through the library’s OPAC allowing for a seamless delivery of material to the end user.

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eBooks! Choices, choices, choices!

Bronwyn Biccard

Abstract

Is it all or nothing with e-books? Am I limited to my current decisions? Is it a “one-model fits all” scenario? E-books present to us a new set of challenges. As a relatively new resource format, e-books give us endless possibilities in terms of content, access models and collection development. As an e-book aggregator, EBSCO provides for our customers the possibility to use a varied and dynamic approach to e-book collection development. From a growing content base, to an array of purchase and subscription models, EBSCO allows for customers to make e-book decisions based on their fundamental needs and requirements.


EBSCO’s Patron-Driven Acquisition programme is a collection development and acquisition model that assists libraries in preserving their budget while maintaining control over the collection development process. Create PDA title lists for your library using specific criteria, and then expose the bibliographic records to end users without purchasing the titles. A title on the PDA list is triggered for purchase when a patron directly accesses the title, guaranteeing that only those titles with usage are purchased.

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E-textbooks: Climbing out of the trough of disillusionment

Ralph Pina

Abstract

The hype around e-textbooks has subsided to an extent, yet most believe that their general adoption is still a matter of “when, not if”. This presentation will briefly consider e-textbooks in the context of the digital learning content ecosystem, share insights and lessons learnt from e-textbook pilots internationally, from Stellenbosch students concerning their mobile device preferences as they relate to digital content and from academics and their needs. As the institutional project manager for e-textbook pilots, as part of the university’s ICT in Learning & Teaching Strategy, the speaker will share some of the platform and business model options under consideration, as well as the challenges.

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How tablets are creating a better learning experience – and how the 21st century library can assist

Johannes Jonker

Abstract

In this talk, I will anecdotally discuss how students are using novel technologies to enhance their learning, by sharing my own experiences in this regard. I will specifically focus on the use of tablets – both inside and outside the classroom – and how this is fundamentally changing the way students learn – for the better. Finally, I will present a brief “wish list” to detail how the 21st century library can better cater for these changing needs.

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Enhancing and enriching learning and research in a digital environment

Geo Quinot

Abstract

In this presentation I will give a practical perspective from the front-line trenches of teaching/learning and research on the increasing influence of the digital world on an academic’s daily activities. I will reflect on students’ expectations and perspectives on digitally enhanced learning activities, drawing inter alia on recent action research regarding the use of podcasting in legal education at Stellenbosch. In this process I will interrogate the facilitator-partnerships that must inevitably be successfully established in order to optimise the student learning experience and support lecturers to utilise technology meaningfully. 

Full Text: PREZI

New and innovative services which broaden libraries’ borders: SUNDigital Collections

Mimi Seyffert, Wouter Klapwijk

Abstract

Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service recently launched SUNDigital Collections, a digital collections repository with specific focus on heritage collections. The aim of this new service is to make material from unique collections of the Library accessible for research and to ensure the long term preservation of these collections.

This presentation will introduce the audience to SUNDigital Collections and the premise on which it was conceptualized, designed and built. The speakers will illustrate the thinking that underpinned the design, integration and discoverability of this new library service with other parallel library services. The unbiased nature of the repository content and system implementation allows this new service to be authentic, authoritative and appropriate within the paradigm of new digital library services.

Within the context of digital preservation, this service attempts to fulfill the obligation academic libraries have to build services that meet the needs of the organisation with which they are affiliated and attempts to meet the needs of discerning users on an user experience level through a functional and graphically rich interface.

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New skills required for innovative 21st century libraries: An epistemological approach

Gavin R Davis

Abstract

Throughout history libraries have been regarded as interfaces between people and recorded information. However, in the 21st century the library cannot regard itself as the only interface leading people to information. With the advent of the Internet (1950s?) and later the World Wide Web (1970s to 1980s) the role of libraries became rather blurred with other interfaces coming to the fore. As early as the mid- 20th century, just after the 2nd World War, there was an unabated exponential growth of information, giving rise to more and more agencies dealing with information. Although librarians have important functions in terms of the systematization of information, e.g. cataloguing, classifying and indexing, the application of newer technologies seems to create an impression that libraries can be bypassed. This paper argues that this need not be the case if a new set of skills for librarians is in place. However, new skills and competencies can only make sense if an epistemology of librarianship is considered and understood. Although it may be argued that a traditional approach to librarianship is not the answer to the challenges facing the 21st century library/librarian, this approach cannot be ignored. Furthermore it is argued that it is a futile and fruitless exercise to instil new skills and competencies in the 21st century librarian if there is a lack of a body of abstract knowledge and a service orientation. The last two traits (necessary attributes for any profession) are explored including a set of skills for innovative 21st century libraries.

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Creating a change culture and leveraging staff’s potential to be creative and innovative

Steyn Heckroodt        

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to elaborate on current challenges in the library fraternity relating to creativity and innovation. In the process it considers the option of creating a change culture and leveraging staff’s potential in addressing the identified challenges. In doing so, it elucidates the role of employees’ knowledge in addressing current challenges, arguing the positive influence that such knowledge can have on the development of innovative capabilities and, by extension, the fraternity’s performance. The paper strongly argues that human resource practices are not directly associated with innovation unless they take employees’ knowledge into account. The paper seeks to explore a mediating role for the uniqueness of knowledge between collaborative human resource practices and innovative activity and seeks implementation of such mediation through the establishment of a change culture.


The paper elucidates the fact that part of the challenge of organizational change lies in addressing the cultural norms that define the current organization.

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